Focus

The anonymous architecture, a globalization transporter

Over the years, technology has been seducing our domestic spaces and urban integrities with possibilities of expansion beyond traditional overviews. At the end of the WWII, military technology was already arising, inserting itself at home for necessity and altering our perceptions of space. Media and technology have dismantled any barrier near or far, expressing the inexistent lines and boundaries between countries, landscapes, events and culture. Today we find ourselves learning from every other culture, from DYI's someone posted online proving its workability or not; with open source technologies that convert our homes into micro labs for our children who suddenly become makers.... READ MORE...

Material addicts: when open access becomes a cult

In recent years, the relationship between materials and designers has been profoundly transformed by the search for new forms of access through increasingly participatory and deep actions, progressively deeper and more participatory, by the processes of new materials’ development and their scope. Up to the 1980s, the designer’s approach to materials definition had mainly been indirect, given the clients’ mediation, serving as interface between planning requirements and the choice of the most appropriate solutions in materials terms.... READ MORE...

Towards a Catalogue of Artists’ Records: Records by Artists (1960-1990)

In 1977, Germano Celant published the volume OffMedia, Nuove Tecniche Artistiche: video disco libro. In this text, recognising the pervasiveness of the record in the contemporary artistic practice, Celant wrote: “In the art of the 1960s the record took its place alongside communications media such as video, the telegram, the photograph, the book and the film […] In line with the reductive theories of the period the record contributes to the isolation of one component of art work, sound, while on the other hand it enriches the array of linguistic tools available for the task of exploding the specifically visual and pushing back the limits of the art process"[1].... READ MORE...

Shiro Takatani. The extension of visible

there is a sort of landscape full of visual and sonic inputs determining – unconsciously – our perception. Just around these minimal perceptions, boundaries of the infinitely small, are the works of the Japanese and worldwide known artist Shiro Takatani, already leader of the Japanese theatre company Dumb Type and today involved in different projects, from installation - as Frost Frames, conceived for the Kyoto Spiral Hall in 1998 and the collaboration with Ryuichi Sakamoto for LIFE – fluid, invisible, inaudible…(2007) – to live performances, like the recent La chambre Claire (2008) and Chroma (2012).... READ MORE...

The Spirit of Uncertainty. A few questions about Political Art

Five potters sit around a small pottery wheel. They work mainly in silence, only speaking occasionally. Their hands mould the soft earthy clay; focused they build upwards ­ slowly but steadily. What is striking, is their commitment to the collective nature of the project. Many visibly struggle to suppress the urge to privilege their own personal creative vision. But they persevere.... READ MORE...

Challenging perception. “SIN”, the first solo exhibition of Mario de Vega

The visitors of “SIN”, Mario de Vega’s first solo exhibition (1979, Mexico City) which opened on June 20th at the Laboratorio Arte Alameda in Mexico City, were requested to first read a sheet with pieces of information on the installations in that exhibition, in order to then sign a declaration of having read and understood the text, of not having recently undergone a surgery operation, as well as of not suffering health problems or upset such as high blood pressure, heart problems, general hypersensitivity, panic attacks, or epilepsy.... READ MORE...

Biohackers. The Politics of Open Science. Hackers aiming at the conquest of the world of science

What do hackers have to do with BioLabs dealing with DNA mapping and testing new modifications of human life? Biohackers is a book written by Alessandro Delfanti, a scholar who studies the relationships between science and society. He tells us not only that the hacker culture has many things in common with the world of science, but also, in a more fascinating way, that the current transformations of life sciences are and will be even more characterized by a mash-up or remix (by adopting the author's own words) between the traditional scientific culture, the hacker ethics and the open access culture.... READ MORE...
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